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CHEMICAL ENGINEERING
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( U.S. Dept. Edu. )
91%
of undergrads participate in research
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June 29, 2020 04:21 PM
The BYU Process Research and Intelligent Systems Modeling (PRISM) group was awarded the 2020 Best Paper from the journal Processes (Impact Factor 1.963). The paper was selected based on impact metrics including citations, views, and under the direction of the editorial board. The paper has been cited 36 times (according to Google Scholar) since it was published in 2018. The award highlights the contributions of the authors to the Processes open-access journal. Contributions were made by Logan Beal, R. Abraham Martin, and Daniel Hill with Dr. John Hedengren as the research advisor. The work is an outcome of the NSF project #1547110, EAGER: Cyber-Manufacturing with Multi-echelon Control and Scheduling. Dr. Logan Beal is currently working for ExxonMobil in Houston, Texas. Dr. Abe Martin is working on aerospace programs in China Lake, CA. Daniel Hill is a current PhD student working on a Hybrid Nuclear Energy Systems with Idaho National Labs and the Department of Energy. The Gekko software is a package for Python and is downloaded about 10,000 times per month according to pypi.org. The package is currently under development to improve machine learning with optimization methods: https://machinelearning.byu.edu
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Mission
History

The Department of Chemical Engineering exists to support the mission of BYU by preparing students for:

  • Lives of Scholarship and Continuous Learning
  • Lives of Service to Family, Church, Community, and Profession
  • Lives of Engineering Products, Processes, and Policies to Improve the Quality of Life for all Humanity

The Department of Chemical Engineering fully supports the mission of BYU and the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints to educate the whole person. Thus, the faculty seek to promote an atmosphere consistent with the gospel of Jesus Christ as a foundation for teaching and learning chemical engineering principles.

Chemical Engineering at Brigham Young University was officially initiated in 1955 as part of the Department of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering. In 1958, a separate Department of Chemical Engineering was formed. The undergraduate program was first accredited in 1961 and has been accredited ever since. A Masters degree in chemical engineering was approved in 1962, and the PhD program received approval in 1968. Today, the department graduates numerous Bachelors, Masters, and PhD students.

For a more detailed history published, see the following CEE article.