Faculty


Faculty | Staff

Faculty Member
Morris D. Argyle

Catalysis

Faculty Member
Larry L. Baxter

Sustainable
Energy  

Faculty Member
Brad C. Bundy

Biochemical
 


Lon Cook

Biomedical
 

Faculty Member
Thomas Fletcher

Combustion
 

Faculty Member
John N. Harb

Electrochemical
Systems

Faculty Member
William C. Hecker

Catalysis
 

Faculty Member
John Hedengren

Process Systems
Engineering  

Faculty Member
Thomas A. Knotts

Molecular
Simulation

Faculty Member
Randy S. Lewis

Biochemical
 

Faculty Member
David O. Lignell

Combustion
 

Faculty Member
William G. Pitt

Biochemical
 

Faculty Member
Dean R. Wheeler

Electrochemical
Systems

Faculty Member
Vince Wilding

Thermophysical
Properties



Research Faculty


Faculty Member
Hugh B. Hales

Research Professor



Adjunct Faculty


Adjunct Faculty Member
Stan Harding

Adjunct Faculty

Adjunct Faculty Member
Mary Rasband

Adjunct Faculty

Adjunct Faculty Member
Nicole Stewart

Adjunct Faculty

Emeritus Faculty


Faculty Member
Ken A. Solen

Biomedical

Faculty Member
Richard L. Rowley

Research Professor

Faculty Member
Calvin H. Bartholomew

Research Professor

Morris D. Argyle

Dr. Morris Argyle grew up in Idaho Falls, ID and received his B.S. degree in Chemical Engineering from Brigham Young University in 1990. Following graduation, he worked for over seven years at ExxonMobil's Baytown, Texas refinery, in a number of positions, including process design, operations support, coordination and economics, and as a technical and an operations supervisor.

Argyle's research interests lie in determining the structure/function relationships of heterogeneous catalysts using spectroscopic techniques, plasma reaction engineering, coal gasification, and new methods for carbon dioxide capture and storage.

He and his wife, Stephanie, who is also a chemical engineer (University of Michigan, 1991), have five children.

Contact Information


Phone Number:                           Publications:
801-422-6239
Email Address:
mdargyle@byu.edu
Web Sites:
Linked In Profile
Research Area:
Catalysis

Larry L. Baxter

Larry Baxter joined the BYU faculty in 2000 after working 14 years at Sandia National Laboratories' Combustion Research Facility. His current research involves experimtental and theoretical sustainable energy research, including carbon capture and storage, biomass, black liquor, and coal combustion and gasification, diagnostic development, and model development.












Contact Information


Phone Number:
801-422-8616
Email Address:
larry_baxter@byu.edu
Web Sites:
Baxter Combustion Lab
Sustainable Energy Solutions
Research Area:
Sustainable Energy

Brad C. Bundy

Dr. Brad Bundy joined the BYU faculty in 2009 after completing his Ph.D. and M.S. degrees at Stanford University and graduating Summa Cum Laude from BYU Chemical Engineering. His current research focuses on developing a technology for the rapid site-specific incorporation of unnatural amino acids into proteins for orientation-controlled biocatalyst immobilization. Dr. Bundy also engineers virus-like particles for vaccine development, drug delivery, and imaging applications. Click here for more info.

Dr. Bundy is committed to excellence in education and was awarded the Outstanding Faculty Teaching Award in Chemical Engineering in 2010 and 2012. He has developed hands-on teaching demonstrations of heat and mass transfer presented to 900+ students at BYU’s Engineering Week Fair. Detailed descriptions are available here.

Dr. Bundy’s lab also focuses on undergraduate research and you can learn more about the 30+ undergraduates who have worked in his lab here.

Contact Information


Phone Number:
801-422-2807
Email Address:
bundy@byu.edu
Web Sites: Professional Web Site
Google Scholar Profile and Linked In Profile
Research Area:
Biochemical

Alonzo Cook

Dr. Alonzo (Lon) Cook joined the BYU faculty in 2012 after 17 years working in the Medical Device Industry. Dr. Cook graduated from BYU with BS and MS degrees in Chemical Engineering, and later received his PhD from MIT, also in Chemical Engineering, with an emphasis on engineering applications in medicine. His industry experience was in business development and research and development of Tissue Engineering and Medical Devices, primarily in the fields of Cardiovascular, Ophthalmic and Orthopedic Products. His previous employers include Semprus BioSciences (Teleflex), Johnson & Johnson and W.L. Gore & Associates. He is also an author on numerous peer-reviewed publications and an inventor on 4 issued patents. His current research focuses on tissue engineering and regenerative medicine.




Contact Information


Phone Number:
801-422-1611
Email Address:
cook@byu.edu
Research Area:
Biomedical



Thomas H. Fletcher

Dr. Thomas H. Fletcher is a Professor in the Department of Chemical Engineering at Brigham Young University. He received a PhD in Chemical Engineering from BYU in 1983. He worked for seven years at the Combustion Research Facility at Sandia National Laboratories in Livermore, California. He has been on the faculty at BYU since 1991, and is currently serving as Associate Chair. Dr. Fletcher is the Director of the Advanced Combustion Engineering Research Center (ACERC) at BYU, which performs about $2 million in research per year. He is a world expert in pyrolysis of coal and low-grade fuels, with more than 30 years of experience in coal research. His research interests include pyrolysis and combustion of coal and biomass, NOx formation from low-grade fuels, coal gasification, oil shale chemistry, use of synfuels in gas turbines, fundamentals of wildland fire ignition, soot formation from aromatic compounds.


Contact Information


Phone Number:
801-422-6236
Email Address:
tom_fletcher@byu.edu
Web Sites:
T. H. Fletcher Web Site
Research Area:
Combustion

John N. Harb

John N. Harb is Professor of Chemical Engineering and Associate Dean of the Ira A. Fulton College of Engineering and Technology at Brigham Young University , following his appointment to the Dean's office in May 2005. He received his BS in Chemical Engineering (1983) from Brigham Young University , Provo and his MS (1986) and PhD (1988) in Chemical Engineering from the University of Illinois , Urbana . He came to BYU directly from graduate school. Professor Harb has been actively involved in engineering education and has developed and delivered workshops for engineering educators. He co-authored a textbook for first-year students in chemical engineering that has been used for over a decade.

Professor Harb and his wife Ruth are the parents of 6 children and the proud grandparents of two adorable grandsons.


Contact Information


Phone Number:
801-422-4393
Email Address:
john_harb@byu.edu
Web Sites:
Professional Web Site
Research Area:
Electrochemical Systems

William C. Hecker

Dr. Hecker’s research at BYU has included exploring the reaction kinetics and surface properties of Fischer-Tropsch (FT) synthesis, catalytic NOx reduction, coal char oxidation, rocket propellants, and oil shale. He has recently initiated work on the kinetic modeling of FT synthesis. Previous to coming to BYU he worked for 2 years at Chevron Research Corporation in catalyst development where his work led to 3 patents and 1.5 years at Dow Chemical Company in coal desulfurization and char pyrolysis. He spent a 6 month sabbatical leave in Australia in 1992 doing research at the University of Newcastle and Macquarie University. He has served as Counselor to the BYU chapter of the American Institute of Chemical Engineers (AIChE) since 1983 and received the national award as the Outstanding Counselor in 1986. Under his direction the BYU chapter has won the Outstanding Chapter Award from national AIChE 15 times. In 1985 he received an award as the Outstanding Teacher in the Chemical Engineering Department.

Contact Information


Phone Number:
801-422-6235
Email Address:
hecker@byu.edu
Research Area:
Catalysis


John Hedengren

Dr. John D. Hedengren is an Assistant Professor of Chemical Engineering at Brigham Young University. His research focuses on innovative algorithms for modeling and optimization of dynamic systems. Applications include the APMonitor Modeling Platform, Biological Systems, Energy Storage in Power Systems, Large-scale Algorithms for Complex Optimization, Reliabili ty Monitoring of Oil and Gas Production, and Unmanned Aerial Systems.

Dr. Hedengren's current research activities are to develop efficient modeling and optimization methods for large-scale dynamic systems. Combining first principles with data driven models allows complex systems to be analyzed to gain fundamental process insight. This insight can be used to design, monitor, and optimize a variety of systems including biological, energy, environmental, and safety applications. Process Research and Intelligent Systems Modeling (PRISM) is developing a world class collaborative research group for the application of innovative advanced process control and optimization techniques.

Contact Information


Phone Number: 801-477-7341
Email Address: john.hedengren@byu.edu
Web Sites:
AP Monitor Software
PRISM Research Group
Optimization Course
Process Control Course
Research Area:
Process Control and Optimization

Thomas A. Knotts

Dr. Knotts joined the faculty of Brigham Young University in the fall of 2006. Dr. Knotts received his B.S. degree in Chemical Engineering from Brigham Young University in 2001. He then travelled to Madison, WI to attend the University of Wisconsin-Madison and pursue graduate studies in the department of Chemical and Biological Engineering. He was advised by Dr. Juan J. de Pablo and graduated with his Ph.D. in Chemical Engineering in 2006.

In keeping with the BYU tradition of undergraduate mentoring, Dr. Knotts advises both graduate and undergraduate researchers. Each student participates in fundamental research, and the group has a strong track record of student-led publications at both the graduate and undergraduate levels.




Contact Information


Phone Number:
801-422-9158
Email Address:
thomas.knotts@byu.edu
Web Sites:
Knotts Research Group
Research Area:
Molecular Simulation

Randy S. Lewis

Dr. Randy S. Lewis received his BS and PhD degrees in Chemical Engineering from Brigham Young University and Massachusetts Institute of Technology, respectively. Prior to joining the faculty at BYU in 2005, Dr. Lewis taught at Oklahoma State University for 11 years. His research areas include sustainable energy, biomaterials, and biological interactions with nitric oxide. He is currently an advisor for the BYU Global Engineering Outreach (GEO) club which works on humanitarian-based engineering projects. In addition to the GEO club, Dr. Lewis coordinates a class in conjuction with GEO in which multi-disciplinary engineering and technology teams work on projects that are implemented around the world. Projects have been conducted in Tonga, Peru, and Ghana.





Contact Information


Phone Number:
801-422-7863
Email Address:
randy.lewis@byu.edu
Research Area:
Biochemical


David O. Lignell

Dr. Lignell is an Assistant Professor in the Chemical Engineering Department at Brigham Young University. His research area is computational modeling and simulation of turbulent reacting flows with an emphasis on combustion. He performs simulation and modeling research using the one dimensional turbulence (ODT) model, direct numerical simulation (DNS), and large eddy simulation (LES).

He received his B.S. and Ph.D. Degrees in Chemical Engineering from the University of Utah in 2001, and 2008. From 2001-2003, he worked as a consulting engineer for Reaction Engineering International. His graduate research was conducted at the Combustion Research Facility at Sandia National Labs where he worked on DNS of soot formation and transport, and flame extinction and reignition. As a post-doctoral researcher, Dr. Lignell worked on the development of the ODT model.


Contact Information


Phone Number:
801-422-1772
Email Address:
davidlignell@byu.edu
Web Sites:
Professional Web Site
Research Area:
Combustion

William G. Pitt

Professor Bill Pitt has been teaching and doing research at BYU since 1987. He obtained a BS in Chemical Engineering in 1983 and a PhD in 1987 in Chemical Engineering with a minor in Materials Science from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. He has taught classes in materials science and engineering, polymer science and engineering, biomedical engineering, fluid mechanics, heat transfer, transport phenomena, unit operations, creative problem solving, and more. He directs research in triggered and targeted drug delivery in cancer treatment. His lab is currently developing phase changing emulsions that change from liquid to gas upon application ultrasound or near infrared light. The volume expansion causes release of drugs from liposomes. He also studies transport of small molecules in contact lenses to release drugs to the eye.



Contact Information


Phone Number:
801-422-2589
Email Address:
pitt@byu.edu
Research Area:
Biochemical

Dean R. Wheeler

Professor Dean Wheeler completed a B.S. at BYU and then earned his Ph.D. in Chemical Engineering in 2002 at UC Berkeley under the direction of John Newman, a recognized leader in the field of electrochemical modeling. In 2005 he received a Career Award from the National Science Foundation to perform molecular modeling studies of electrochemical reactions. His research interests include modeling and experimental work to optimize batteries, fuel cells, and electrodeposition. He has led federally funded research programs for low-impedance lithium-ion battery electrodes, leading to fabrication and modeling advances. He additionally has consulted for a number of companies in the area of electrochemical technology.






Contact Information


Phone Number:
801-422-4126
Email Address:
dean_wheeler@byu.edu
Web Sites:
Professional Web Site
Research Area:
Electrochemical Systems

Vince Wilding

Dr. Wilding graduated with a BS in chemical engineering from BYU in 1981 and went on to get his PhD in chemical engineering from Rice University in 1985. After graduating he worked at Wiltec Research Company, Inc. where he was Research Director for several years before being appointed company President. He left Wiltec to join the chemical engineering faculty at BYU in 1994. He conducts research in thermophysical property measurement and correlation, environmental engineering, and process design. He served as Department Chair from 2001 to 2006. In 2004 Dr. Wilding received the Karl G. Maesar Excellence in Teaching Award.







Contact Information


Phone Number:
801-422-2393
Email Address:
wildingv@byu.edu
Research Area:
Thermophysical Properties

Ken A. Solen

Dr. Solen is interested in increasing the compatibility of artificial organs with blood. He has developed several tools for assessing the reactions of blood to man-made materials and devices, and he and his students are working to understand the surface and flow characteristics that activate those reactions. Clicking on the "Research" link will provide more details.

Dr. Solen is also interested in educational strategies in chemical engineering and has co-authored (along with Professor John Harb) the first-year course and textbook providing an Introduction to Chemical Engineering for first-year college students.






Contact Information


Phone Number:
801-422-6237
Email Address:
ken_solen@byu.edu
Web Sites:
Professional Web Site
Research Area:
Biomedical

Hugh B. Hales

Hugh Hales joined BYU's Chemical Engineering Department in 1995 as a Research Professor. He was previously employed by Exxon and Mobil Oil Companies and as an Assistant Professor of Chemical Engineering at The Massachusetts Institute of Technology. His research interests are in the area of Petroleum Engineering, particularly reservoir simulation, which is the computer simulation of the flows of oil, gas, and water through subterranean oil reservoirs. He has taught several classes at BYU, including 263, "Problem-Solving Techniques for Chemical Engineers", and 541, "Computer Design Methods", which parallel his research interests.







Contact Information


Phone Number:
801-422-3749
Email Address:
hbhales@byu.edu
Research Area:
Reservoir Simulation


Richard L. Rowley

Dr. Rowley received his BS degree in Chemistry from BYU in 1974 and his PhD from Michigan State University in 1978. He taught at Rice University in Houston from 1978 to 1984 and has taught at BYU since 1984. He served as chair of the BYU Chemical Engineering Department twice, from 1990 to 1995 and then again from 2007 to 2010.

A main focus of TPL is the DIPPR-801 pure-chemical thermophysical property database. This database is recognized as the gold standard of pure chemical properties and is one of the primary data engines used by the chemical process industry throughout the world. The project uses chemical, molecular structure and thermodynamic knowlege to evaluate measured and predicted data and recommend the best possible values for a complete set of 44 properties for each chemical. This work is funded by the Design Institute for Thermophysical Properties, an institute within AIChE.


Contact Information


Email Address:
rowley@byu.edu





Calvin H. Bartholomew

Dr. Bartholomew joined the Chemical Engineering faculty in 1973. He teaches courses treating kinetics, catalysis, catalyst deactivation, air pollution control, creativity, and engineering materials. Prior to joining Brigham Young University, he was employed by Corning Glass Works, Corning New York, where he served as Senior Chemical Engineer in Automotive Emissions Control and Surface Chemistry Research. He is a member of the American Chemical Society (past-president of the Central Utah Section), the American Institute of Chemical Engineers, the California Catalysis Society (past-president), The Rocky Mountain Fuel Society (founder), Tau Beta Pi, Sigma Xi, and the Western States Catalysis Club (founder). He was a 1983 recipient of the BYU Karl G. Maeser Research Award and was chosen as the Outstanding Faculty member in the Engineering College in 1985.


Contact Information


Email Address:
calb@byu.edu